Florida



Public Breastfeeding Law

383.015 Breastfeeding.—The breastfeeding of a baby is an important and basic act of nurture which must be encouraged in the interests of maternal and child health and family values, and in furtherance of this goal:
(1) A mother may breastfeed her baby in any location, public or private, where the mother is otherwise authorized to be, irrespective of whether the nipple of the mother’s breast is uncovered during or incidental to the breastfeeding.

——-

800.02 Unnatural and lascivious act.—A person who commits any unnatural and lascivious act with another person commits a misdemeanor of the second degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083. A mother’s breastfeeding of her baby does not under any circumstance violate this section.

——–
(h) “Sexual conduct” means actual or simulated sexual intercourse, deviate sexual intercourse, sexual bestiality, masturbation, or sadomasochistic abuse; actual lewd exhibition of the genitals; actual physical contact with a person’s clothed or unclothed genitals, pubic area, buttocks, or, if such person is a female, breast, with the intent to arouse or gratify the sexual desire of either party; or any act or conduct which constitutes sexual battery or simulates that sexual battery is being or will be committed. A mother’s breastfeeding of her baby does not under any circumstance constitute “sexual conduct.”

——–
847.0135 Computer pornography; traveling to meet minor; penalties.—
(1) SHORT TITLE.—This section shall be known and may be cited as the “Computer Pornography and Child Exploitation Prevention Act.”
(2) COMPUTER PORNOGRAPHY.—A person who:


(d) A mother’s breastfeeding of her baby does not under any circumstance constitute a violation of this subsection.

Enforcement Provision

None

Workplace Pumping Law

None

Enforcement Provision

None



51 Responses to “Florida”

  1. Laura says:

    Is this all including restaurants? I hate feeling like I need to go to restroom to feed my child. She won’t eat with the loud, sporadic flushing. I wouldn’t choose a table in the middle of the restaurant if I knew it was close to her feeding time, but if I were to choose a booth in the back…

    • admin says:

      Yes, all restaurants but be sure to note that there is no enforcement provision which has led to harassment happening in Florida restaurants with some regularity. :(

  2. Jodi miranda says:

    There was an amendment signed on the Fair Labor Standards Act on march 23, 2010 for working mothers that pump… It specifically states that the space provided can not be a bathroom…and provides for one year from baby’s birthdate

    • admin says:

      Check out the “Federal” page on the site. The amendment to the FLSA carries no penalty unless a women is fired and eligible for lost wages. There is currently no effective workplace pumping protection.

      • Julie says:

        I believe there is a pumping at work provision in the health care reform act. Do you have an idea if this will change the current federal law?

  3. Sarah says:

    I always feed her when I am out to eat! Or anywhere! I have a great bebe au lait cover.. But sometimes I don’t cover either. I haven’t ever had a problem because we are usually in a booth and the only person that sees is my dining partner and sometimes the waitress and they have never cared either. I have never fed my baby in a restaurant bathroom don’t plan on it!

    • Myra says:

      Same here have nursed my 3 children everywhere in FL covered to best of my ability and have never experienced harassment.

  4. Jessica says:

    Ok. we will be moving to fl this summer and lo will be 18 months old. He not considered a baby. Does anyone know the laws reguarding this. thanks in advance

    • admin says:

      Have a look at the Florida law page. :)

    • admin says:

      Duh. you are here.

      The term “baby” is not defined but to my knowledge no one has been harassed in Florida on the basis of the child not being a “baby.” However, harassment in Florida is not uncommon and the biggest problem is the lack of an enforcement provision.

  5. Jess says:

    I have breastfed my baby all over this country: airplanes, restaurants, malls, parks, libraries, etc. I have not had any negative feedback, maybe just some funny looks. I usually smile and wave. It makes them feel uncomfortable that we are so comfortable feeding (the way mother nature intended) in public. I am a BF coach and encourage women in this country to do what feels right, regaurdless of social influences. If you wouldn’t eat in a bathroom, please do NOT make your baby do so!

  6. Bunnysmommy says:

    I breastfeed my 2 month old anywhere & everywhere! Including restaurants, public transportation, grocery stores (ie the seats in front of publix)… I’ve only ever had problems with other patrons harassing me. Particularly, one very ignorant young woman who screamed for me to “cover up” as I struggled to juggle my screaming baby and a scarf I use for covering. Is there any laws making it illegal to yell at or threaten a nursing mother and child?

    • Kathryn says:

      I cannot believe that this ignorant person yelled at you. I have been seen nursing in public and walking around. My baby was 5 months old and started getting fussy so I went to a quiet corner (I had a nursing cami on and a top over that) and proceeded to undo my snaps. I put her on and someone walked over to the area I was in. I was a bit embarrased but after I had my baby latched I proceeded to walk around with her in my arms nursing. I got some wierd looks but no one said anything. Even my DH looked at me strangely. But the way I look at it is my baby was hungry and she needed to eat. I will not deny my child’s needs for the sake of mankind being “uncomfortable” with my exposed breat while nursing. My baby and me both have a right to do this. If I were you I might have yelled back at her and said, go get a clue lady. People really need to remember the true nature of what breasts were intended for — nursing and caring for our children, period! Anyone who has a hard time understanding this really should go get a clue. I applaud you for doing what is right for you and your child. Don’t let people like this derail you. Nursing is your right as a mother – end of story. Good luck in the future.

  7. Bunnysmommy says:

    I breastfeed my 2 month old anywhere & everywhere! Including restaurants, public transportation, grocery stores (ie the seats in front of publix)… I’ve only ever had problems with other patrons harassing me. Particularly, one very ignorant young woman who screamed for me to “cover up” as I struggled to njuggle my screaming baby and a scarf I use for covering. Is there any laws making it illegal to yell at or threaten a nursing mother and child?

  8. Bunnysmommy says:

    Four months and we are still going strong! I’m so glad I toughed it out. In my attempt to help normalize nursing in all public places we nurse even ever and where ever. No cover necessary. Good luck yo all of the moms who find themselves in unfortunate situations due to their attempt to do what is right for their babies.

  9. Tiff says:

    Does anyone know if it is legal to ask a breastfeeding mom to cover up? I know they cannot ask you to stop… but what about giving you something (like a dishcloth or napkin) and requiring you to cover up? Here’s the situation: my husband and I went out to a local restaurant to eat and they were packed. Our 6 month old got hungry while we were there, so I nursed him at the table. He was just about finished (he only takes 10 minutes to feed!) when the manager came over and told us she understood but it was making some of the other patrons uncomfortable, do I have a cover I could use? When I told her no, she said “Ok, well I will bring you something to use as a cover.” I let her know I would not be using it as covers upset my son – they really do, he gets terribly mad and pulls the thing off and then I’m trying to wrangle a screaming, squirmy baby and a blanket? No thank you! Anyway, the manager was stunned and said I needed to cover up or go somewhere else to nurse him. Before she could continue, he finished eating and everything was fine, but I wondered… can the restaurant really require me to cover up?

    • admin says:

      Tiff, the law that applies to public breastfeeding in your state generally applies to requests to cover up. What state are you in?

      • Tiff says:

        I live in FL

        • Layla says:

          Tiff here’s a website (http://www.flbreastfeeding.org/legislation.htm). My understanding no you do not have to cover up>> License to Breastfeed in Public
          It’s the Law in FLORIDA!
          Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:
          Section 1. The breastfeeding of a baby is an important
          and basic act of nurture which must be encouraged in
          the interests of maternal and child health and family values.
          A mother may breastfeed her baby in any location, public
          or private, where the mother is otherwise authorized to be,
          irrespective of whether or not the nipple of the mother’s
          breast is covered during or incidental to the breastfeeding.
          House bill

          • admin says:

            Florida’s law has no enforcement provision and is violated without consequence regularly.

  10. Layla says:

    Tiff here’s a website (http://www.flbreastfeeding.org/legislation.htm) . My understanding no you do not have to cover up>> License to Breastfeed in Public
    It’s the Law in FLORIDA!
    Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:
    Section 1. The breastfeeding of a baby is an important
    and basic act of nurture which must be encouraged in
    the interests of maternal and child health and family values.
    A mother may breastfeed her baby in any location, public
    or private, where the mother is otherwise authorized to be,
    irrespective of whether or not the nipple of the mother’s
    breast is covered during or incidental to the breastfeeding.
    House bill

  11. Vachi says:

    Maybe I’m wrong, but – Obviously enforcement provisions would make a huge difference in the practicality of public nursing. But one would think that the ability to quote state law and the ability to threaten legal action (ie a lawsuit for .. discrimination if nothing else?) would be equally effective.

    • admin says:

      No Vachi, there is no legal action to threaten someone with for discriminating against a breastfeeding woman in Florida. That is the point. The state law above has no mechanism for enforcement and no other law applies.

  12. Alyssa says:

    Although there is no enforcement on harrasment towards a breastfeeding mother I highly doubt that action won’t be taken if you or your baby is threatened. Law Enforcement, at least where I live, are currently taking threats very seriously.

    • admin says:

      I agree but what is considered a threat can vary widely. Asking a mother to leave or cover up is not generally considered a threat by law enforcement. There are many circumstances in which a mother feels threatened but not by action law enforcement can do anything about. This is where enforcement provisions come in.

      • Washington Irving says:

        Dear Jake,

        Your response to “Anon” that she is wrong and that “this page is all the law there is on this issue in Florida” doesn’t correctly relate FPL 383.015, 800.02, 847.0135 to rest of Florida’s statutes or case law.

        Anon could not, for example, have been charged with trespass under the fact pattern she described, exactly because Florida law authorizes women to breastfeed in public accommodations in Florida. Nor could she have been detained by the sports bar owner/agent as a trespasser until police arrived; doing so would have constituted false imprisonment, which would be enforceable against the owner/agent, and created a private cause of action for Anon.

        A woman could be injured by not expressing her milk, as Florida gives her a right to do, which one can imagine would provide grounds for a private cause action under certain circumstances.

        The point is, Anon gave an excellent example of how to model a response to the circumstance of being confronted by the owner/agent of a public accommodation while breastfeeding in Florida:
        1) Carry a copy of the law
        2) Document the confrontation
        3) Remain calm and do not participate in an argument
        4) Ask for the authorities to be called if you choose to stay
        5) Provide responding authorities with a copy of the law
        6) Demonstrate documentation of the confrontation
        7) Remain calm, speak calmly and confidently, and be polite.

        DO NOT go batshit. DO NOT make threats to strip. Both would be good reasons to nullify your authorization to be in a public accommodation in Florida, and be grounds for a your arrest.

        Breastfeeding, by itself, is not grounds for arrest in Florida.

        Anon’s example reflects some of the types of direct action advocated first, in the US, by Dr. Martin Luther King – peaceful, non-violent, direct action. Except in this case the law is already on the side of the mother.

        Also, Florida, like every state, protects the physical being of the mother, defining threats of physical touching and uninvited physical touching and violence as crimes. Florida has actually taken the defense of one’s person too far, IMO, but these statutes are also relevant to this issue. The law must be read as a whole.

        I know that you are an advocate for an enforcement mechanism for FS 383.015. But I think loving parents are also looking for information that empowers them to take direct action, today. And to feel confident that they will be safe doing so.

        They know that a woman’s body is a miracle and that breastfeeding is the BEST thing for the health of both baby and mother.

        Many new parents, like me, are going to work for the enforcement mechanism that FS 383.015 needs. But many others, like Anon, or Nicole, are going to take direct action now, today. They need the open minded, listening, and creative support that lawyers like you, and me, can provide to encourage their actions.

        Thank you for this web-site.

        Sincerely,

        W.I., JD MPH

        • admin says:

          Ms. Irving-

          I will take your comment piece by piece:

          “Anon could not, for example, have been charged with trespass under the fact pattern she described, exactly because Florida law authorizes women to breastfeed in public accommodations in Florida. Nor could she have been detained by the sports bar owner/agent as a trespasser until police arrived; doing so would have constituted false imprisonment, which would be enforceable against the owner/agent, and created a private cause of action for Anon.”

          I must disagree. If the owner of a public accommodation converts her from an invitee to a trespasser and asks that she leave, refusing to leave is grounds for arrest for the crime of trespass. I never wrote that the owner could detain her. He absolutely could NOT do so without violating a whole bundle of state laws. A private right of action? Perhaps if she is detained and suffers damage as a result but private claims for violation of the public breastfeeding law in Florida have been filed and failed.

          “A woman could be injured by not expressing her milk, as Florida gives her a right to do, which one can imagine would provide grounds for a private cause action under certain circumstances.”

          The owner of a public accommodation has no obligation to prevent mastitis in his customers. There is no private right of action for refusing to allow a woman to breastfeed in a public accommodation in Florida. Now if you meant this only to apply to cases in which a woman is forcible detained – well that is a completely different fact scenario and tort law applies.

          As for the following being the appropriate way to deal with the owner of a public accommodation in Florida, again I strongly disagree:

          “1) Carry a copy of the law
          2) Document the confrontation
          3) Remain calm and do not participate in an argument
          4) Ask for the authorities to be called if you choose to stay
          5) Provide responding authorities with a copy of the law
          6) Demonstrate documentation of the confrontation
          7) Remain calm, speak calmly and confidently, and be polite.”

          I am a strong supporter of civil disobedience and have a long history of engaging in it. However, I do not ever recommend that breastfeeding moms engage in it, either with or without the child being present. If she is deemed a trespasser, she can be arrested. If she is arrested and no one is present to take the baby, the baby will go into state custody (this has happened). Mom’s arrest might involve an overnight stay, as arrest often do, and mom is unlikely to have any way to pump, either to provide milk for the child or to relieve engorgement.

  13. Sueb says:

    Breastfeeding is a choice. I respect that. But it is not socially acceptable to Force your views upon others. Knowing very well how people are uncomfortable and offended by not only the site, but the odor, it’s kind of rude to them. I have no problem if I see a well covered baby nursing in the mall. However when a mother exposes herself, in a restaurant, knowing it’s upsetting others, is quite selfish. Respect goes both ways. I actually was so repulsed by a woman breastfeeding with her whole top down, in a restaurant. She was smugly lecturing the entire place how it was her right. After her child fell asleep a table of 8 broke into a loud festive happy birthday song for their child (who thankfully didn’t see the breastfeeder. The breastfeeder was livid that they woke her sleeping baby and started making demands that people quiet down….as if all the patrons should not be allowed to enjoy their evening cause her baby was woken up. Poor management is hand tied by law not to force her to cover up. So soon other patrons were singing happy birthday as loud as can be and it was an awful evening. The baby was crying, the restaurant was getting louder and louder. Finally she and her baby left on tears, as others clapped. It was all beyond upsetting for everyone. Her husband waited for their food to be boxed up. He was so embarrassed that he apologized to everyone. I felt awful for him.

    However, her smug “…it’s my right…” stance irritated everyone. Had she not been so brazen, so disrespectful to the discomfort of others, none of that would happen. The applause and nasty remarks said to her on the way out was nasty. But she brought it on herself. She had no right to demand others be quiet, abd curtail their loud even obnoxious behavior, as they have rights too.

    Freedom of thought and expression goes both ways.

    Discretion, and respect goes along way. By trying to force people to accept your opinion of breastfeeding is creating animosity.

    • admin says:

      “Freedom of thought and expression goes both ways” means moms get to breastfeed and you get to be offended by it. It does *not* mean that you get to stop the conduct that offends you.

      Owners of public accommodations are legally bound not to discriminate against protected classes of people, regardless of who is made uncomfortable. Otherwise, they should open *private* clubs. Public means public. Lots of things in public space offend me. Twelve year old girls in push-up bras and those shorts that reveal butt cheek offends me. Any man who is not a competitive swimmer wearing a Speedo offends me. But each year when I vacation with my kids at the Jersey shore I am forced to see people in this attire by the dozens. What do I do? Look away. Sigh. Suppress the desire to say to the girls, “Don’t you realize you are treating yourself like a sexual object of no other worth?” and to say to the men, “You know, nobody wants to see that.” I don’t say it because my discomfort is *my* problem and if seeing these things makes me so uncomfortable I should stay home.

      And perhaps so should you.

    • Reese says:

      The odor? What in the world are you talking about?

  14. Stephany I says:

    I love the fact that other women like myself have questions about breastfeeding. Our nation desperately needs a movement promoting breastfeeding. As our nations women become more confident ” I can do anything attitude” why haven’t we stood together for ourselves and our babies! SUEB, since when is it ok to bully someone. It is sicking to think that the whole resteraunt played a role in harassing this lady. However I’m sure you think boobs are just for push-ups. Get a clue breast milk is the best start to life you can give your child!

  15. NICOLE says:

    As a “soon to be” breast feeding mom in Florida I’m concerned about what to do if I am ever asked to leave an establishment due to breast feeding. I’m aware of my right to do so but can places actually ask you to leave.. what happens if you refuse to leave or refuse to cover up? Say for example a restaurant. Can you be arrested if you are asked to leave/ cover up and do not comply? I would have to imagine that if, for example, a restaurant manager tells you that you must leave and you refuse you could still very well be charged with trespassing or something to that affect?

    • admin says:

      Please read the articles on this site. They explain how, under a law like Florida’s, you can have your “invitee” status withdrawn and become a “trespasser” subject to arrest if you don’t leave.

  16. Anon says:

    Nicole,
    According to FL law, you cannot be arrested or charged with trespassing or any other violations if you refuse to leave any place because they asked you to cover up or leave. Unfortunately, though, there have been instances where police were called due to “trespassing” because a woman refused to leave a place (particularly restaurants) because she was breastfeeding. As a former breastfeeding mother in FL, I experienced my fair share of discrimination. I nursed my baby until he was 2 wherever and whenever he needed it. To be perfectly honest though, the VAST majority of the time all you will get are some funny looks. The best way to handle those, at least for me, was to either ignore it or smile and say “Hello! Have a beautiful day!” The more comfortable you are nursing in public, the more comfortable others are. You will still run into people who are flat-out disgusted by breastfeeding, and they’re the only ones who make a big deal out of things and do ridiculous things like call police. I had something like that happen three times in the entire 2 years my son nursed. The first time I was asked to cover up or leave (he was 3 weeks old and it was our first time out of the house) I was completely unprepared and embarrassed, and we left. When we got home I swore I’d never let that happen again. I printed out a couple sheets of business cards with the FL statute stating a woman has a right to breastfeed and started carrying them in the diaper bag. The next time someone had a problem, I smiled and gave them a card. That nearly always stopped them in their tracks. The only instance it didn’t work was in a sports bar where the manager asked us to leave and called the police to haul us in under trespassing charges. My husband was keen enough to tape what was happening on his phone. The officers seemed very confused as to what to do, especially after my husband showed them the tape and I gave them the card. I asked them to please call the owner of the establishment, since it was only the manager who asked us to leave. The owner came down, watched the tape, and ended up comping our meal. No one was arrested. I imagine this is a very unusual situation, but I guess the moral is this – don’t let yourself or your baby be bullied.

  17. admin says:

    “Anon,” I am afraid you are wrong. What is on this page is all the law there is on this issue in Florida.

  18. NICOLE says:

    Admin, It could just be my hormones but your response’s aren’t very helpful, there actually coming off as kind of condescending.

    As a “soon to be” breast feeding mom in Florida I’m concerned about what to do if I am ever asked to leave an establishment due to breast feeding & I refuse…

    I read the articles on this site and countless others… I’m looking for some advise on what to do if ever faced with that situation.

    • admin says:

      Well, Nicole, I am fairly sure the information you seek is in the articles. A good many people ask me questions that are answered in the articles. I do not mean to sound condescending but it does grow wearisome.

      The answer to your question is what I have said: Florida law does not protect you. You can take a stand and risk arrest (or the more likely yelling and humiliation) or you can leave. If you want Florida to have an enforcement provision, then women in Florida can join together in drafting and lobbying for such a bill. I can’t give you advice that does not exist. You want me to tell you that you have a legal remedy in the event you are breastfeeding and the owner of the establishment asks for you to leave. I have told you: you can be arrested. I am not making it up. That really is the answer.

      I absolutely do not recommend risking arrest with a child. If you want to complain and raise a fuss, call the press, organize a nurse-in, do it after your child is safely home with a caretaker.

      You get that this is an entirely volunteer project right?

  19. NICOLE says:

    I’ll be blatant with you as you seem to read a lot into what people have written here. I think the tact you show as a volunteer and snide attitude on this topic leave much to be desired. Perhaps these “15 years” have burnt you out and you have lost actual passion in what you are attempting to accomplish or maybe today was just stressful and you felt like lashing out. Do you honestly see insulting people as a way to gather support? “You are not being helpful” is not code for anything. It simply means the responses you provide are not helpful. I never asked for a specific answer, just clarification as well as some constructive criticism on some plausible ways to handle that situation. (that was directed to the entire comment thread not solely at you…)
    Assuming that the person you are responding to wouldn’t want/ be capable of advocating for legislative change is silly, calling them childish because they sought help from a community of women designed for just that is asinine. If you feel the need to be so snide because.. as you stated.. Similar questions are wearisome.. save it for the opposition.
    You stated “You want me to tell you that you have a legal remedy in the event you are breastfeeding and the owner of the establishment asks for you to leave. I have told you: you can be arrested. I am not making it up. That really is the answer.” At no point did I ask you if I had a legal remedy. “ Again.. I just asked what one should do if faced with that situation, not once have I asked about legal remedies that is something you read into. I’m sure there are several different ways to go about handling that situation… As I stated in my earlier post I was simply asking to be armed with some ideas as to how to handle that situation should it ever arise. I agree with you that Florida should have an enforcement provision but again… my comment was simply asking for guidance on how to handle being thrown out of an establishment. Considering the fact that I am currently on bed rest for low amniotic fluid and quite frankly I think dealing with you any further is useless and frustrating I’ll seek advice on this topic elsewhere… someplace a bit more nurturing and a little less hostile.

    • admin says:

      I’m sorry. I am tired.

      I realize being on bed rest just plain sucks. Been there, done that.

      I believe “Lactation and the Law” has a section on what to do if you have no legal resources but it may have been pulled into a sidebar which I should put up here. This is a legal site which I own and am soley responsible for as the expert lawyer on breastfeeding in the US. Lots of conferences, lots of horror stories, lots of court appearances recently. I am just ragged. No excuse for being snarky with you. I apologize.

      And, yes, I am a little burnt out. I wish I had some more constructive answer for you. I was never asked to leave a place for breastfeeding. I was once refused use of a dressing room in a children’s clothing store (in which to nurse – first time out with new baby, not yet comfortable with whipping it out). My reaction: I went batshit and threatened to strip in the middle of the store and nurse right there. Just mamabear instinct. But now after so any years of seeing women who have refused to leave traumatized by what comes next, I never advise women to resist. I used to, but I learned my lesson when a breastfeeding mom was thrown cuffed and face down into a police car in 80 degree weather either no windows open or air conditioning on. For 20 minutes.

      My advice if you are harassed is to take names but leave peacefully. Then write a complaint to the owner (particularly if it wasn’t the owner who harassed you) describing the incident. Generally I advise not only asking for an apology but for employee training and inclusion of a good public breastfeeding policy in the employee manual. Settling these incidents this way is fairly common. Florida has a relatively high number of harassment cases but also a good record of positive resolutions.

      Again, I apologize for my bitchiness. I shouldn’t respond to comments when I am exhausted. And I was probably more than a little irritated at the other commenter telling you the law was something it isn’t.

      Please feel free to come to me for assistance. It is what I am here for. And I do know more about this than anyone else.

      Oh, also, I absolutely did not mean to imply that women can’t change laws. I am currently working with groups in Idaho, Missouri, Georgia and Texas who are doing just that. Moms DO change laws. Right now, you should keep your feet up and having someone bringing you cool drinks. But someday you could work with other Florida women on an enforcement provision. Or not.

      Be well.

      Jake

  20. Angela says:

    I just want to say that I found this information very useful and I am glad to have found this website.
    Nursing mom of a 13 month old, New Resident in FL.
    Thank you!
    Angela

  21. Cruskaya says:

    Two weeks ago I was told that “breastfeeding at the pool deck area is a Big NO NO” at Nickelodeon Hotel in Orlando, Florida while breastfeeding my one and a half moth old baby. I felt disrespected but it was greater the pain and sadness I felt to see a young lady form the hotel staff was telling that to me. She will be a mother some day and will have to breastfeed (hopefully) that day I hope she remembers me and the sorrow and surprise in my face. It is unbelievable to even think that breastfeeding is prohibited in a family friendly place specially where here were women wearing tiny bikinis showing more skin than me while trying to feed my baby.

  22. […] Marcus, J. A. Florida Public Breastfeeding Laws. Breastfeeding Law, State Laws. Lactation and the Law Revisited. Retrieved from: http://breastfeedinglaw.com/state-laws/florida/ […]

  23. […] and hearsay.  Regardless of her behavior, she was correct on her rights to breastfeed in public.  Florida law states she may breastfeed in public, with any amount of breast or nipple exposed.  However, there […]