Nevada



Public Breastfeeding Law

NRS 201.232 Breast feeding: Legislative intent; authorized in any public or private location where mother is authorized to be.
1. The Legislature finds and declares that:
(a) The medical profession in the United States recommends that children from birth to the age of 1 year should be breast fed, unless under particular circumstances it is medically inadvisable.
(b) Despite the recommendation of the medical profession, statistics reveal a declining percentage of mothers who are choosing to breast feed their babies.
(c) Many new mothers are now choosing to use formula rather than to breast feed even before they leave the hospital, and only a small percentage of all mothers are still breast feeding when their babies are 6 months old.
(d) In addition to the benefit of improving bonding between mothers and their babies, breast feeding offers better nutrition, digestion and immunity for babies than does formula feeding, and it may increase the intelligence quotient of a child. Babies who are breast fed have lower rates of death, meningitis, childhood leukemia and other cancers, diabetes, respiratory illnesses, bacterial and viral infections, diarrheal diseases, otitis media, allergies, obesity and developmental delays.
(e) Breast feeding also provides significant benefits to the health of the mother, including protection against breast cancer and other cancers, osteoporosis and infections of the urinary tract. The incidence of breast cancer in the United States might be reduced by 25 percent if every woman breast fed all her children until they reached the age of 2 years.
(f) The World Health Organization and the United Nations Children’s Fund have established as one of their major goals for the decade the encouragement of breast feeding.
(g) The social constraints of modern society weigh against the choice of breast feeding and lead new mothers with demanding time schedules to opt for formula feeding to avoid embarrassment, social ostracism or criminal prosecution.
(h) Any genuine promotion of family values should encourage public acceptance of this most basic act of nurture between a mother and her baby, and no mother should be made to feel incriminated or socially ostracized for breast feeding her child.
2. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a mother may breast feed her child in any public or private location where the mother is otherwise authorized to be, irrespective of whether the nipple of the mother’s breast is uncovered during or incidental to the breast feeding.
(Added to NRS by 1995, 126)

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NRS 201.210 Open or gross lewdness; penalty.

2. For the purposes of this section, the breast feeding of a child by the mother of the child does not constitute an act of open or gross lewdness.
[Part 1911 C&P § 195; A 1921, 112; NCL § 10142]—(NRS A 1963, 63; 1965, 1465; 1967, 476; 1973, 95, 255, 1406; 1977, 866; 1979, 1429; 1983, 206; 1991, 1008; 1995, 127, 1199, 1327; 1997, 2501, 3188)

NRS 201.220 Indecent or obscene exposure; penalty.

2. For the purposes of this section, the breast feeding of a child by the mother of the child does not constitute an act of open and indecent or obscene exposure of her body.
[Part 1911 C&P § 195; A 1921, 112; NCL § 10142]—(NRS A 1965, 1465; 1967, 476; 1973, 96, 255, 1406; 1977, 867; 1979, 1429; 1983, 206; 1991, 1008; 1995, 127, 1200, 1327; 1997, 2501, 3189)

Enforcement Provision

None

Workplace Pumping Law

None

Enforcement Provision

None



7 Responses to “Nevada”

  1. SEC. 4207. REASONABLE BREAK TIME FOR NURSING MOTHERS.

    Section 7 of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (29 U.S.C. 207) is amended by adding at the end the following:

    (1) An employer shall provide—(A) a reasonable break time for an employee to express breast milk for her nursing child for 1 year after the child’s birth each time such employee has need to express the milk; and (B) a place, other than a bathroom, that is shielded from view and free from intrusion from coworkers and the public, which may be used by an employee to express breast milk.

    (2) An employer shall not be required to compensate an employee receiving reasonable break time under paragraph (1) for any work time spent for such purpose.

    (3) An employer that employs less than 50 employees shall not be subject to the requirements of this subsection, if such requirements would impose an undue hardship bycausing the employer significant difficulty or expense when considered in relation to the size, financial resources, nature, or structure of the employer’s business.

    (4) Nothing in this subsection shall preempt a State law that provides greater protections to employees than the protections provided for under this subsection.

    With the inclusion of this provision in health care reform legislation, the U.S. joins the rest of the industrialized world in recognizing breastfeeding as the natural outcome of pregnancy, and workplace lactation programs as the natural outcome of a society where the majority of mothers and infants are separated due to work.

    • admin says:

      Yes, this appears on the Federal page. If you go there, you can read my explanation of why this is helping few women. The last paragraph:

      With the inclusion of this provision in health care reform legislation, the U.S. joins the rest of the industrialized world in recognizing breastfeeding as the natural outcome of pregnancy, and workplace lactation programs as the natural outcome of a society where the majority of mothers and infants are separated due to work.

      is just propaganda. This is “feel good” legislation and does not actually require that employers provide employees with these accommodations.

  2. I am a Breastfeeding Peer Counselor in Nevada. I had a client ask me if there were any laws here pertaining to PUMPING IN PUBLIC. My state coordinator said it is not included in the wording of our state law for BREASTFEEDING IN PUBLIC, which is true. So would that make Pumping in public illegal?

    • admin says:

      Pumping in public is not illegal, just as breastfeeding in public is not illegal. But it isn’t protected. Which means if the owner of the space wants convert you from an invitee to a trespasser, you can be arrested if you refuse to leave.

      While technically pumping in public would likely fall under the public indecency law, to my knowledge no women in the US has ever been charged with public indecency for either breastfeeding or pumping – and women pump in their cars all the time.

      Hope that helps.

  3. Kimi Kearns says:

    I was wondering if there is anything within the law books that require the lactation room to be heated? What laws are there to protect a mother that wants to nurse beyond a year? Or to pump beyond a year? I have encountered some issues with a large company that I work for and would love to discuss this further.

    • admin says:

      Nevada has no workplace pumping law so the answers to all your question, unfortunately, are no. You aren’t entitled to a room at all.

  4. Kimi Kearns says:

    They are required to provide an area though?